Holy Holiday Gets Its Horror Movie

DIRECTOR: Jeremy Todd Morehead CAST: Morehead, Robert Z’dar, Ari Lehman EASTER SUNDAY generates its texture with a layering of creative contradictions. The film has feet in two worlds. On...

DIRECTOR: Jeremy Todd Morehead

CAST: Morehead, Robert Z’dar, Ari Lehman

EASTER SUNDAY generates its texture with a layering of creative contradictions. The film has feet in two worlds.

On one hand it is very much a retro film. The look of the movie has been adjusted to have the appearance of 70s-vintage celluloid that has seen a little wear making its rounds of the drive-ins and grindhouses. The story concept is also classic horror. It’s multiple concepts, really:

  • a slasher film complete with a holiday theme, a grim family secret as backstory, a masked psychopath, wise-cracks, and creative, gory deaths and a bit of skin
  • a classic don’t-fuck-with-the-occult tale, with a party ruined thanks to reading a summons of the dead that turns out to be more real and effective than anybody really expected while they were popping the tops off their beers

The summoning is how we get our killer up and walking around. He is the father of one of the characters and he dug running amok with an axe and an Easter bunny mask. Now, thanks to dicking around with the occult, which always turns out to be more than fun and games for a bacchanalia, the mad, Easter-obsessed is back and up to his nasty tricks.

But beyond the vintage slasher vibe and the 70s/80s occult horror angle, there is very much a sense of new school indie horror, a certain zany hipness that fits right in with the more self-aware and often tongue-in-cheek horror coming out of the horror underground nowadays.

A perfect example is the killer, who, while fulfilling the slasher tropes of weird mask, smart-ass remarks, deadly weapon of butchery, and so forth, is also a very modern creation in its attitude.

Mixing the occult, possession, slasher archetypes and a cultivated old film look, with a contemporary retro awareness, EASTER SUNDAY has pulled off no small coup in making these elements work in tandem rather than causing cringes.

The movie is entertaining as soon as it starts and never flounders in that regard – or any other, for that matter.

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